Overview magazines

Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.

ROUGH VEGAN KITCHENS

Statistics, trendwatchers, and big food businesses: all of them are proving veganism is on the rise. Last year, the number vegans in the US grew by 600%, across the pond in the UK the number was 350%. Going vegan isn’t just for the gentle souls anymore. These rough vegan kitchens show plantbased can be 100% rock & roll.

 Frank Lindner  Xiao-Er Kong

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JACK BEAN,
ROTTERDAM

Rotterdam in the Netherlands has recently been visited by Jack Bean. The new vegan restaurant hopes to inspire others to enjoy more plantbased food.

Their chosen method of persuasion is healthy fastfood. From burgers and sandwiches to bowls with a variety of sides. Prices are anywhere between 4 and 10 dollars. Jack Bean has also committed to five promises:

  • A 100% plantbased menu
  • No compromise on flavor.
  • Fighting food waste
  • Keep innovating
  • Be honest to your guests

Weena 702, Rotterdam (The Netherlands)
www.jackbean.nl

NO BONES BEACH CLUB

In 2014, it began with a vegan food truck called No Bones About It. A year later, a fire nearly killed the dream. But they didn’t give up, and rose like a phoenix from the ashes.

In 2015, Seattle Weekly named No Bones About It the best food truck in Seattle out of 120 other mobile kitchens, most of which were decidedly not vegan. In 2016 they opened their first brick & mortar restaurant in Seattle: the No Bones Beach Club. It wasn’t long before a second location opened in Portland, and Chicago is next on the menu. They serve vegan sandwiches, salads, and plates to share. The prices range between 9.5 and 13 dollars. Part of each month’s revenue is donated to a changing roster of local non-profits fighting against animal suffering.

5410 17th Ave NW, Seattle (Washington State, USA)
3928 N Mississippi Ave, Portland (Oregon, USA)
nobonesbeachclub.com

MANA! FAST SLOW FOOD

Mana! Fast Slow Food is a tiny restaurant in the centre of Hong Kong. Zero-waste, free water, as much raw food as possible, and the smallest possible carbon footprint are the pillars of this place.

The menu has powerful plantbased burgers with names like The Classic or The Aztec. Guests order a single or a combo burger. The latter offers skin-on fries or sweet potato wedges with six different sauces. Your average burger is around 12 dollars. Be sure not to miss the next level vegan flatbread rolls.

The space as well as the food have been cleverly designed to make almost any picture look good. In the Instagram age, that certainly doesn’t hurt.

92 Wellington St, Central (Hong Kong)
www.mana.hk

VÖNER, BERLIN

In 2007 vegan kebabrestaurant Vöner opened its doors in Berlin. Plantbased döner, kebab is their specialty.

That’s not the only thing they serve, however. Other fastfood staples like burgers and traditional German currywurst are present and plantbased. They even made a veggie fish & chips. Prices range between 5 and 8 dollars. Aside from the savory selection they also have sweet pie and a diverse selection of locally made lemonades.

Boxhagener Straße 56, Berlin (Germany)
www.facebook.com/Voener

GOODNESS,
TEL AVIV

The Middle East, Israel as well, is known for its vegetable cuisines. Extra inspiring: when traditional meat dishes get a plant-based makeover.

Goodness can be found in the heart of Tel Aviv. It’s a small restaurant with a rough industrial look. They specialize in customizable plantbased burgers, with a wide range of toppings. The traditional shawarma has also been given a vegan redesign. A burger will set you back around 13 bucks.

King George St 41, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel)
goodness.co.il

ROUGH VEGAN KITCHENS

Statistics, trendwatchers, and big food businesses: all of them are proving veganism is on the rise. Last year, the number vegans in the US grew by 600%, across the pond in the UK the number was 350%. Going vegan isn’t just for the gentle souls anymore. These rough vegan kitchens show plantbased can be 100% rock & roll.

Lees verder

 Frank Lindner  Xiao-Er Kong

MANA! FAST SLOW FOOD

Mana! Fast Slow Food is a tiny restaurant in the centre of Hong Kong. Zero-waste, free water, as much raw food as possible, and the smallest possible carbon footprint are the pillars of this place.

The menu has powerful plantbased burgers with names like The Classic or The Aztec. Guests order a single or a combo burger. The latter offers skin-on fries or sweet potato wedges with six different sauces. Your average burger is around 12 dollars. Be sure not to miss the next level vegan flatbread rolls.

The space as well as the food have been cleverly designed to make almost any picture look good. In the Instagram age, that certainly doesn’t hurt.

92 Wellington St, Central (Hong Kong)
www.mana.hk

GOODNESS,
TEL AVIV

The Middle East, Israel as well, is known for its vegetable cuisines. Extra inspiring: when traditional meat dishes get a plant-based makeover.

Goodness can be found in the heart of Tel Aviv. It’s a small restaurant with a rough industrial look. They specialize in customizable plantbased burgers, with a wide range of toppings. The traditional shawarma has also been given a vegan redesign. A burger will set you back around 13 bucks.

King George St 41, Tel Aviv-Yafo (Israel)
goodness.co.il

VÖNER, BERLIN

In 2007 vegan kebabrestaurant Vöner opened its doors in Berlin. Plantbased döner, kebab is their specialty.

That’s not the only thing they serve, however. Other fastfood staples like burgers and traditional German currywurst are present and plantbased. They even made a veggie fish & chips. Prices range between 5 and 8 dollars. Aside from the savory selection they also have sweet pie and a diverse selection of locally made lemonades.

Boxhagener Straße 56, Berlin (Germany)
www.facebook.com/Voener

NO BONES BEACH CLUB

In 2014, it began with a vegan food truck called No Bones About It. A year later, a fire nearly killed the dream. But they didn’t give up, and rose like a phoenix from the ashes.

In 2015, Seattle Weekly named No Bones About It the best food truck in Seattle out of 120 other mobile kitchens, most of which were decidedly not vegan. In 2016 they opened their first brick & mortar restaurant in Seattle: the No Bones Beach Club. It wasn’t long before a second location opened in Portland, and Chicago is next on the menu. They serve vegan sandwiches, salads, and plates to share. The prices range between 9.5 and 13 dollars. Part of each month’s revenue is donated to a changing roster of local non-profits fighting against animal suffering.

5410 17th Ave NW, Seattle (Washington State)
3928 N Mississippi Ave, Portland (Oregon)
www.obonespdx.com/aloha

JACK BEAN,
ROTTERDAM

Rotterdam in the Netherlands has recently been visited by Jack Bean. The new vegan restaurant hopes to inspire others to enjoy more plantbased food.

Their chosen method of persuasion is healthy fastfood. From burgers and sandwiches to bowls with a variety of sides. Prices are anywhere between 4 and 10 dollars. Jack Bean has also committed to five promises:

  • A 100% plantbased menu
  • No compromise on flavor.
  • Fighting food waste
  • Keep innovating
  • Be honest to your guests

Weena 702, Rotterdam (The Netherlands)
www.jackbean.nl