Caloric
intake
kcal per day

Frank Lindner   Eatforum.org  Sander van der Meij

These 7 plates are examples of a planetary health diet. They can be used for an individual weekly diet or inspiration for restaurant and catering menus. The menu is made by Norwegian chef Lise Finckenhagen and corresponds with EAT-Lancet’s Planetary Health Diet. It is a flexitarian diet, which is largely plant-based. It can optionally include modest amounts of fish, meat and dairy foods. For ingredients and preparation, click on each photo.

- Prof. Walter Willet MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Co-chairman EAT-Lancet Commission

“Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts. Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.”

Launched at the beginning of 2019 the EAT-Lancet report shows scientifically proven that drastic twists and turns are needed to make people and the planet healthier and more sustainable. In terms of nutrition and food production. This is how you can do this on a daily basis. As a food professional and as a human being.

22,5 %

27,5 %

15 %

Title

INFOGRAPHIC

  5 min

EAT-Lancet on your plate

Macronutrient intake
grams per day

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

SO: Both technological solutions applied along the food supply chain and implementation of public policies are required in order to achieve an overall 50% reduction in global food loss and waste. 

DO: Minimize food waste in your kitchen. At the restaurant or at home. Use tools to measure and give guidance on your waste. Get more creative with nose to tail and stem to leaf cooking. Read the Food Inspiration edition on Food Waste.

SO: We need to feed humanity on existing agricultural land and adopting a "Half Earth" strategy for biodiversity conservation. Moreover, there is a need to improve the management of the world’s oceans. Fisheries do not negatively impact ecosystems, fish stocks are utilized responsibly, and global aquaculture production is expanded sustainably.   

DO: Be maximum informed as a food professional where the products and ingredients you use come from. Where and how they have been produced, demand total transparency from your supplier or store.

SO: We need a new agricultural revolution that is based on sustainable intensification and driven by sustainability and system innovation.  

DO: Chefs and restaurateurs need to get closer to and be more connected with sustainable oriented farmers and gardeners, or become them themselves.

SO: Agriculture and fisheries must not only produce enough calories to feed a growing global population but must also produce a diversity of foods that nurture human health and support environmental sustainability. 

DO: Food professionals that buy food can stimulate this strategy by choosing the right items that are healthy and sustainable for people and planet. Get to educate restaurant customers - or your family members - by preparing delicious dishes and tell the story behind the ingredients.

SO: we need to increase consumption of plant-based foods – including fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and whole grains. While in many settings substantially limiting animal source foods. 

DO: Chefs and restaurateurs can play a major rol since they create dishes and dictate the menu. Get staff to train in preparing tasty vegetarian dishes.

The EAT-Lancet report contains five strategies that must be deployed to achieve a radical transformation of the global food system. Without taking action, goals such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement are not achieved. The planet and future generations are at serious risk. New generations must then live on a planet that is in a worse condition than their parents generation.

Achieving a sustainable food system that can deliver healthy diets for a growing population presents formidable challenges. Finding solutions to these challenges requires an understanding of the environmental impacts of various actions.

Healthy diets have an optimal caloric intake and consist largely of a diversity of plant-based foods, low amounts of animal source foods, contain unsaturated rather than saturated fats, and limited amounts of refined grains, highly processed foods and added sugars.

The EAT-Lancet report contains two important objectives:

The planetary health diet, based on health considerations, is consistent with many traditional eating patterns. It does not imply that the global population should eat exactly the same food, nor does it prescribe an exact diet. The planetary health diet outlines empirical food groups and ranges of food intakes, which combined in a diet, would optimize human health. Local interpretation and adaptation of the universally-applicable planetary health diet is necessary and should reflect the culture, geography and demography of the population and individuals.


811


232

Whole grains
Rice, wheat, corn and other

120

31 (0-31)

Added sugar
All sugars

354
96

40 (20-80)
11,8 (0-11,8)

Added fats
unsaturated fats
Saturated fats

30
62
19
40
284
291

14 (0-28)
29 (0-58)
13 (0-25)
28 (0-100)
75 (0-100)
50 (0-75)

Protein sources
Beef, lamb or pork
Chicken and other poultry
Eggs
Legumes
Fish
Nuts

153

250 (0-500)

Dairy foods
Whole milk or equivalants

126

200

Fruits
All fruits

78

300 (200-600)

Vegetables
All vegetables

39

50 (0-100)

tubers and starchy vegetables potatoes and cassava

Scientific targets for a planetary health diet, with possible ranges, for an intake of 2.500 kcal/day. Source: Eat-Lancet

These 7 plates are examples of a planetary health diet. They can be used for an individual weekly diet or inspiration for restaurant and catering menus. The menu is made by Norwegian chef Lise Finckenhagen and corresponds with EAT-Lancet’s Planetary Health Diet. It is a flexitarian diet, which is largely plant-based. It can optionally include modest amounts of fish, meat and dairy foods. For ingredients and preparation, click on each photo.

Macronutrient intake per day

KCAL
per day

Launched at the beginning of 2019 the EAT-Lancet report shows scientifically proven that drastic twists and turns are needed to make people and the planet healthier and more sustainable. In terms of nutrition and food production. This is how you can do this on a daily basis. As a food professional and as a human being.

Frank Lindner   Eatforum.org  Sander van der Meij

“Transformation to healthy diets by 2050 will require substantial dietary shifts. Global consumption of fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes will have to double, and consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar will have to be reduced by more than 50%. A diet rich in plant-based foods and with fewer animal source foods confers both improved health and environmental benefits.”

- Prof. Walter Willet MD, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Co-chairman EAT-Lancet Commission

120

31 (0-31)

Added sugar
All sugars

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

SO: We need a new agricultural revolution that is based on sustainable intensification and driven by sustainability and system innovation.  

DO: Chefs and restaurateurs need to get closer to and be more connected with sustainable oriented farmers and gardeners, or become them themselves.

SO: We need to feed humanity on existing agricultural land and adopting a "Half Earth" strategy for biodiversity conservation. Moreover, there is a need to improve the management of the world’s oceans. Fisheries do not negatively impact ecosystems, fish stocks are utilized responsibly, and global aquaculture production is expanded sustainably.   

DO: Be maximum informed as a food professional where the products and ingredients you use come from. Where and how they have been produced, demand total transparency from your supplier or store.

SO: Both technological solutions applied along the food supply chain and implementation of public policies are required in order to achieve an overall 50% reduction in global food loss and waste. 

DO: Minimize food waste in your kitchen. At the restaurant or at home. Use tools to measure and give guidance on your waste. Get more creative with nose to tail and stem to leaf cooking. Read the Food Inspiration edition on Food Waste.


811


232

Whole grains
Rice, wheat, corn and other

39

50 (0-100)

tubers and starchy vegetables potatoes and cassava

78

300 (200-600)

Vegetables
All vegetables

126

200

Fruits
All fruits

153

250 (0-500)

Dairy foods
Whole milk or equivalants

30
62
19
40
284
291

14 (0-28)
29 (0-58)
13 (0-25)
28 (0-100)
75 (0-100)
50 (0-75)

Protein sources
Beef, lamb, pork
Chicken
Eggs
Legumes
Fish
Nuts

354
96

40 (20-80)
11,8 (0-11,8)

Added fats
unsaturated fats
Saturated fats

SO: Agriculture and fisheries must not only produce enough calories to feed a growing global population but must also produce a diversity of foods that nurture human health and support environmental sustainability. 

DO: Food professionals that buy food can stimulate this strategy by choosing the right items that are healthy and sustainable for people and planet. Get to educate restaurant customers - or your family members - by preparing delicious dishes and tell the story behind the ingredients.

SO: we need to increase consumption of plant-based foods – including fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds and whole grains. While in many settings substantially limiting animal source foods. 

DO: Chefs and restaurateurs can play a major rol since they create dishes and dictate the menu. Get staff to train in preparing tasty vegetarian dishes.

Scientific targets for a planetary health diet, with possible ranges, for an intake of 2.500 kcal/day. Source: Eat-Lancet

The planetary health diet, based on health considerations, is consistent with many traditional eating patterns. It does not imply that the global population should eat exactly the same food, nor does it prescribe an exact diet. The planetary health diet outlines empirical food groups and ranges of food intakes, which combined in a diet, would optimize human health. Local interpretation and adaptation of the universally-applicable planetary health diet is necessary and should reflect the culture, geography and demography of the population and individuals.

The EAT-Lancet report contains two important objectives:

Healthy diets have an optimal caloric intake and consist largely of a diversity of plant-based foods, low amounts of animal source foods, contain unsaturated rather than saturated fats, and limited amounts of refined grains, highly processed foods and added sugars.

Achieving a sustainable food system that can deliver healthy diets for a growing population presents formidable challenges. Finding solutions to these challenges requires an understanding of the environmental impacts of various actions.

The EAT-Lancet report contains five strategies that must be deployed to achieve a radical transformation of the global food system. Without taking action, goals such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement are not achieved. The planet and future generations are at serious risk. New generations must then live on a planet that is in a worse condition than their parents generation.

Overview magazines

Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.
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