Overview magazines

Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

  4 min

LONGREAD HOW TO

REDISCOVERED
KITCHEN
TECHNIQUES

Apart from rediscovering forgotten ingredients and products, an increasing number of chefs and cooks is adopting ‘forgotten’ cooking techniques. Kitchen knowledge from grandmother's days is coming back. With great respect for the trade, techniques for smoking, fermenting, pickling and drying are back. For longer shelf life as well as improved flavour.

Frank Lindner & Hans Steenbergen Sander van der Meij   

Tradition is hip. Getting our hands dirty is OK again. We prefer imperfection over standardisation. Brewing beer, baking bread, fermenting vegetables, drying meat. We are rediscovering how our grandparents used to cook. 

Reinventing traditions

In an expanding world of knowledge and data, young generations are embracing artisanship. They are exploring old techniques and methods that are nearing extinction and are starting a new business. Full of hope, trust and ideals. They are proud of what they are making. An increasing number of young entrepreneurs combines social and personal goals with operating a business. Artisanship is cool again because manual labour is rewarding. It is personal. You are in control of your product from start to finish. 

Artisanship
is personal

Food is taking the lead in the revival of manual labour. Young people are becoming bakers, butchers, wine farmers, cheese makers, sausage makers, fish smokers, coffee roasters, beer brewers. Why? It won’t make you rich for now, but the trade is so much more rewarding than working with spreadsheets and memos in some anonymous role at a large firm. Artisans receive what earth has to offer, deploy their craftsmanship and add value to the ingredients in order to create an honest and tasty product. 

Receiving what
earth has to offer

TASTE EFFECT
Enhancement of umami flavours compared to the initial product. Often resulting in products with higher acidity. More bitterness, especially in vegetables.

FERMENTING

Fermentation is the process of converting or breaking down the raw material of a product by micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Heat and moisture facilitate growth of micro-organisms. As they multiply, micro-organisms produce enzymes that change the acidity, flavour, scent, appearance, digestibility and shelf life of the product. Fermentation occurs in a wide range of products including yoghurt, cheese, beer, bread, tempeh, wine, sauerkraut, kimchi, soy sauce and vinegar. Fermentation is an ancient way of making food more sustainable since it extends the shelf life. 

INSPIRATION
Lacto-fermented asparagus

SMOKING

Smoking makes a product dryer which prevents micro-organisms from growing. This ancient way to treating meat and fish goes way back. A distinction is made between cold smoking, which takes hours, often keeping the temperature below 25°C, and warm smoking where high temperatures are applied, requiring less time. Apart from meat and fish, vegetables and fruits can be smoked as well. 

TASTE EFFECT
Extended smoking causes collagen in meat and fish to break down which makes the product more tender. More earthy flavours. More stimulating and piercing flavours.  

INSPIRATION
Overnight slow-roasted and smoked beetroot

PICKLING

Pickling is a method involving heating the food in a (glass) jar. This kills off most of the micro-organisms and gets rid of the air trapped in the top of the jar. Once cooled down, the product barely contains any air and therefore less oxygen. Pickling is usually done with a fluid and flavourings. Popular ingredients are sugar, salt and alcohol. Almost anything can be pickled: vegetables, fruit, fish and meat. Pickling used to be a method to ensure that certain products were available for consumption for a larger portion of the year. Today, ingredients are often available year-round and pickling is mainly used for its flavouring effect. 

TASTE EFFECT
High acidity compared to the initial product. May deteriorate the crunchiness of certain products (such as radish and gherkins).  

INSPIRATION
Pickled rhubarb 

TASTE EFFECT
Higher acidity and sweetness compared to the initial product.   

INSPIRATION
Dried citrus slices (e.g. for cocktails)

Conservation is a way of extending the shelf life of food. Undesirable micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, yeasts, viruses) are killed off or prevented from growing. This extends the shelf life of the food and reduces the risk of getting sick as a result of eating it. Without moisture, micro-organisms are not or barely able to grow. As a result, dried products such as dried apricots or figs often have extended shelf lives. This also applies to dried meats such as sausage, ham and jerky.

DRYING

Receptuur

Dashi

REDISCOVERED
KITCHEN
TECHNIQUES

Apart from rediscovering forgotten ingredients and products, an increasing number of chefs and cooks is adopting ‘forgotten’ cooking techniques. Kitchen knowledge from grandmother's days is coming back. With great respect for the trade, techniques for smoking, fermenting, pickling and drying are back. For longer shelf life as well as improved flavour.

  4 min

FERMENTING

Fermentation is the process of converting or breaking down the raw material of a product by micro-organisms such as bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Heat and moisture facilitate growth of micro-organisms. As they multiply, micro-organisms produce enzymes that change the acidity, flavour, scent, appearance, digestibility and shelf life of the product. Fermentation occurs in a wide range of products including yoghurt, cheese, beer, bread, tempeh, wine, sauerkraut, kimchi, soy sauce and vinegar. Fermentation is an ancient way of making food more sustainable since it extends the shelf life. 

TASTE EFFECT
Enhancement of umami flavours compared to the initial product. Often resulting in products with higher acidity. More bitterness, especially in vegetables.

INSPIRATION
Lacto-fermented asparagus

SMOKING

Smoking makes a product dryer which prevents micro-organisms from growing. This ancient way to treating meat and fish goes way back. A distinction is made between cold smoking, which takes hours, often keeping the temperature below 25°C, and warm smoking where high temperatures are applied, requiring less time. Apart from meat and fish, vegetables and fruits can be smoked as well. 

TASTE EFFECT
Extended smoking causes collagen in meat and fish to break down which makes the product more tender. More earthy flavours. More stimulating and piercing flavours.  

INSPIRATION
Overnight slow-roasted and smoked beetroot

PICKLING

Pickling is a method involving heating the food in a (glass) jar. This kills off most of the micro-organisms and gets rid of the air trapped in the top of the jar. Once cooled down, the product barely contains any air and therefore less oxygen. Pickling is usually done with a fluid and flavourings. Popular ingredients are sugar, salt and alcohol. Almost anything can be pickled: vegetables, fruit, fish and meat. Pickling used to be a method to ensure that certain products were available for consumption for a larger portion of the year. Today, ingredients are often available year-round and pickling is mainly used for its flavouring effect. 

TASTE EFFECT
High acidity compared to the initial product. May deteriorate the crunchiness of certain products (such as radish and gherkins).  

INSPIRATION
Pickled rhubarb 

DRYING

Conservation is a way of extending the shelf life of food. Undesirable micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi, yeasts, viruses) are killed off or prevented from growing. This extends the shelf life of the food and reduces the risk of getting sick as a result of eating it. Without moisture, micro-organisms are not or barely able to grow. As a result, dried products such as dried apricots or figs often have extended shelf lives. This also applies to dried meats such as sausage, ham and jerky.

INSPIRATION
Dried citrus slices (e.g. for cocktails)

TASTE EFFECT
Higher acidity and sweetness compared to the initial product.   

Reinventing traditions

Tradition is hip. Getting our hands dirty is OK again. We prefer imperfection over standardisation. Brewing beer, baking bread, fermenting vegetables, drying meat. We are rediscovering how our grandparents used to cook. 

Receiving what
earth has to offer

Food is taking the lead in the revival of manual labour. Young people are becoming bakers, butchers, wine farmers, cheese makers, sausage makers, fish smokers, coffee roasters, beer brewers. Why? It won’t make you rich for now, but the trade is so much more rewarding than working with spreadsheets and memos in some anonymous role at a large firm. Artisans receive what earth has to offer, deploy their craftsmanship and add value to the ingredients in order to create an honest and tasty product. 

Artisanship
is personal

In an expanding world of knowledge and data, young generations are embracing artisanship. They are exploring old techniques and methods that are nearing extinction and are starting a new business. Full of hope, trust and ideals. They are proud of what they are making. An increasing number of young entrepreneurs combines social and personal goals with operating a business. Artisanship is cool again because manual labour is rewarding. It is personal. You are in control of your product from start to finish. 

Frank Lindner & Hans Steenbergen Sander van der Meij   

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