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Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.

Different cultures have different culinary celebrations.

  3 min

Food insights

Food eaten during festivities is often filled with meaning, steeped in symbolism and rich in tradition. Different cultures have different culinary celebrations. We asked a Greek, Turkish, Mexican, Dutch, Indian, Italian and English person to share their most beloved, crazy, or meaningful celebratory dish.

  Roset Pieper      Marlijn van Ingen & Julia Daalder     Roset Pieper & Sander van der Meij

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What: 
Dutch biscuits, spread with butter and covered with blue-white (for boys) or pink-white (for girls) aniseed sprinkles. 

When:
Birth

Why:
Every birth in The Netherlands is celebrated with ‘beschuit met muisjes’. The aniseed stems make them look like little mice, hence the name ‘muisjes’.

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What: 
Dough dome filled with fragrant rice, chicken, currants and nuts.

When:
Wedding

Why:
The nuts represent the husband and wife, the currants their prospective children. The pastry shapes the roof of the house.

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What: 
Shiny red boiled eggs

When:
The evening before Easter Sunday

Why:
The eggs are tapped together, while one person says: “Christos Anesti!” (Christ has risen!), while the other person says: “Alithos Anesti” (Indeed he has risen!). This symbolises Christ’s emergence from the tomb and the blood that he lost.

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What: 
Filled pork paw called zampa,
and boiled lentils

When:
New Year’s Eve

Why:
The lentils symbolize prosperity. In ancient Roman times, people would fill their pouches with lentils, hoping one day they would turn into coins.

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What: 
Diamond shaped dessert made out of cashew nuts, sugar, cardamom and ghee, covered in edible silver. 

When:
Diwali/Ganesh Chaturthi

Why:
Kaju Katli brings good luck and prosperity to the home where it’s served. The edible silver signifies luxury and appreciation for the ones eating it.

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What: 
Pan de Muertos, bread of the dead, flavoured with aniseed and orange. 

When:
Día de los Muertos

Why:
Spirits of the dead are guided home by the smell of their favorite food. An essential offering is Pan de Muertos. The cross on top symbolizes the bones of the dead.

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What: 
A steamed pudding, filled with spices, dried fruits and currants. After steaming, strong liquor is regularly poured over to soak into the pudding. 

When:
Christmas

Why:
Traditionally the pudding is made with thirteen ingredients, representing Jesus and his twelve Apostles.

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

  3 min

Food eaten during festivities is often filled with meaning, steeped in symbolism and rich in tradition. Different cultures have different culinary celebrations. We asked a Greek, Turkish, Mexican, Dutch, Indian, Italian and English person to share their most beloved, crazy, or meaningful celebratory dish.

  Roset Pieper     Marlijn van Ingen & Julia Daalder     Roset Pieper & Sander van der Meij

Lees verder

What: 
Dutch biscuits, spread with butter and covered with blue-white (for boys) or pink-white (for girls) aniseed sprinkles. 

When:
Birth

Why:
Every birth in The Netherlands is celebrated with ‘beschuit met muisjes’. The aniseed stems make them look like little mice, hence the name ‘muisjes’.

What: 
Dough dome filled with fragrant rice, chicken, currants and nuts.

When:
Wedding

Why:
The nuts represent the husband and wife, the currants their prospective children. The pastry shapes the roof of the house.

What: 
Shiny red boiled eggs

When:
The evening before Easter Sunday

Why:
The eggs are tapped together, while one person says: “Christos Anesti!” (Christ has risen!), while the other person says: “Alithos Anesti” (Indeed he has risen!). This symbolises Christ’s emergence from the tomb and the blood that he lost.

What: 
Filled pork paw called zampa,
and boiled lentils

When:
New Year’s Eve

Why:
The lentils symbolize prosperity. In ancient Roman times, people would fill their pouches with lentils, hoping one day they would turn into coins.

What: 
Diamond shaped dessert made out of cashew nuts, sugar, cardamom and ghee, covered in edible silver. 

When:
Diwali/Ganesh Chaturthi

Why:
Kaju Katli brings good luck and prosperity to the home where it’s served. The edible silver signifies luxury and appreciation for the ones eating it.

What: 
Pan de Muertos, bread of the dead, flavoured with aniseed and orange. 

When:
Día de los Muertos

Why:
Spirits of the dead are guided home by the smell of their favorite food. An essential offering is Pan de Muertos. The cross on top symbolizes the bones of the dead.

What: 
A steamed pudding, filled with spices, dried fruits and currants. After steaming, strong liquor is regularly poured over to soak into the pudding. 

When:
Christmas

Why:
Traditionally the pudding is made with thirteen ingredients, representing Jesus and his twelve Apostles.