HOSPITALITY AND TRUST

  4 min

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

INTERVIEW

Chef Adam Rice focuses on hospitality that provides nourishment and care coupled with trust and confidence

Hospitality and trust for food services company ISS Guckenheimer

Adam Rice is a Regional Executive Chef at Guckenheimer @ Google. Chef Adam started cooking thirty years ago for one simple reason: to make people happy. Food Inspiration asked him about his vision with regard to changes in gastronomy since COVID-19.

 Jaimy van der Linden  Xiao Er Kong

We have had to shift our thinking from creating dishes that inspire to creating dishes that inspire and we could execute within this new environment.”

“Because of some of the challenges we have experienced over the last few months as a result of COVID-19, our emphasis and our focus has really been on simple and delicious offerings that people recognize and love. We have also worked toward furthering a culture that provides transparency and openness in how we approach hospitality and good food.”

“Because the region I oversee is so broad, and travel has been so limited, we have had to become experts at connecting virtually. As a leader who oversees our Executive Chefs and assists General Managers with our culinary initiatives, I have been impressed with our team’s ability to pivot and acclimate in this new environment. Together, we have managed daily online menu checks, user feedback, online training sites and regular meetings from afar. In the process, we have created a stronger, more unified team.

How did COVID-19 change the way you work?

We are very focused on intertwining hospitality with trust in our practices.”

Our menus have changed. We have had to shift our thinking from creating dishes that inspire to creating dishes that inspire and we could execute within this new environment. Our first priority shifted from ‘what can we cook’ to ‘how we can serve what we cook’. Simply getting people fed took precedence before creativity and passion were sprinkled back in. Sites created their own menus, but some of the offerings included Grilled Tuscan Chicken Thighs with Lemon and Rosemary, Texas Style Slow Smoked Beef Brisket, and Summer Fresh Vegetable Lasagna with Smoked Gouda Bechamel. We had to remove some items that were breaded or too lean to hold up to transport or reheating, such as fish and lean protein.”

What is the influence of COVID-19 on your menu?

"When we began this journey in March, our guests varied from those who were hyper-aware of the new climate we found ourselves in, to those who were more resistant to change. Now that it’s July we have all come into a new understanding of necessary measures and what makes sense, and we are more at ease. Many guests shifted their food choices to foods that do well in a "To-Go" style of service.”

Has the behavior of your guests changed since the start of the Coronavirus crisis?

“This has been a personal journey for all of us. As our knowledge has grown, so has our understanding of how to keep each other safe. My wife runs her own business and had to close that business for almost two months; we feel fortunate that I’ve been able to continue working in a supportive environment over these last few months, and she’s been able to re-open successfully.”

What is the influence on your personal situation?

We are at a moment when hospitality and caring for the people we feed has never been more important. And we are striving for this in a way that nourishes while continuing to instill trust and confidence”

I have been consistently struck by the resilience and strength of our team. Our front line team members provide assurance and comfort in a period of uncertainty and change.” 

What have been the most important lessons you have learned from the Coronavirus crisis?

“I think it will be increasingly important to drive connections the old fashioned way, and build on the relationships between our customers and the chefs and cooks that create our dishes. I also think that self service will look much different, and that transparency will be necessary to maintain the trust of those we are serving. Our chefs and cooks are very adept at overcoming daily challenges; I have an incredible amount of confidence that we will come back from this stronger than ever before.” 


What do you think cafes will look like in a post-COVID world?

I have an incredible amount of confidence that we will come back from this stronger than ever before”

  4 min

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

Hospitality and trust for food services company ISS Guckenheimer

Chef Adam Rice focuses on hospitality that provides nourishment and care coupled with trust and confidence

Adam Rice is a Regional Executive Chef at Guckenheimer @ Google. Chef Adam started cooking thirty years ago for one simple reason: to make people happy. Food Inspiration asked him about his vision with regard to changes in gastronomy since COVID-19.

 Jaimy van der Linden  Xiao Er Kong

We have had to shift our thinking from creating dishes that inspire to creating dishes that inspire and we could execute within this new environment.”

“Because of some of the challenges we have experienced over the last few months as a result of COVID-19, our emphasis and our focus has really been on simple and delicious offerings that people recognize and love. We have also worked toward furthering a culture that provides transparency and openness in how we approach hospitality and good food.”

“Because the region I oversee is so broad, and travel has been so limited, we have had to become experts at connecting virtually. As a leader who oversees our Executive Chefs and assists General Managers with our culinary initiatives, I have been impressed with our team’s ability to pivot and acclimate in this new environment. Together, we have managed daily online menu checks, user feedback, online training sites and regular meetings from afar. In the process, we have created a stronger, more unified team.

How did COVID-19 change the way you work?

We are very focused on intertwining hospitality with trust in our practices.”

Our menus have changed. We have had to shift our thinking from creating dishes that inspire to creating dishes that inspire and we could execute within this new environment. Our first priority shifted from ‘what can we cook’ to ‘how we can serve what we cook’. Simply getting people fed took precedence before creativity and passion were sprinkled back in. Sites created their own menus, but some of the offerings included Grilled Tuscan Chicken Thighs with Lemon and Rosemary, Texas Style Slow Smoked Beef Brisket, and Summer Fresh Vegetable Lasagna with Smoked Gouda Bechamel. We had to remove some items that were breaded or too lean to hold up to transport or reheating, such as fish and lean protein.”

What is the influence of COVID-19 on your menu?

"When we began this journey in March, our guests varied from those who were hyper-aware of the new climate we found ourselves in, to those who were more resistant to change. Now that it’s July we have all come into a new understanding of necessary measures and what makes sense, and we are more at ease. Many guests shifted their food choices to foods that do well in a "To-Go" style of service.”

Has the behavior of your guests changed since the start of the Coronavirus crisis?

“This has been a personal journey for all of us. As our knowledge has grown, so has our understanding of how to keep each other safe. My wife runs her own business and had to close that business for almost two months; we feel fortunate that I’ve been able to continue working in a supportive environment over these last few months, and she’s been able to re-open successfully.”

What is the influence on your personal situation?

We are at a moment when hospitality and caring for the people we feed has never been more important. And we are striving for this in a way that nourishes while continuing to instill trust and confidence”

I have been consistently struck by the resilience and strength of our team. Our front line team members provide assurance and comfort in a period of uncertainty and change.” 

What have been the most important lessons you have learned from the Coronavirus crisis?

“I think it will be increasingly important to drive connections the old fashioned way, and build on the relationships between our customers and the chefs and cooks that create our dishes. I also think that self service will look much different, and that transparency will be necessary to maintain the trust of those we are serving. Our chefs and cooks are very adept at overcoming daily challenges; I have an incredible amount of confidence that we will come back from this stronger than ever before.” 


What do you think cafes will look like in a post-COVID world?

I have an incredible amount of confidence that we will come back from this stronger than ever before”

Contact

More Food Inspiration? Follow us at www.foodinspiration.com! Questions or feedback? Get in contact with the editors of Food Inspiration Magazine.
Please enter your name
Please enter a correct e-mail address
Please enter a comment
Thank you! Your message has been sent.
Something went wrong while submitting the form. Try again.

Share this article

Forward this page by e-mail or share it directly on social media.

Search

Search here
Minimal length to search is 3 characters

Overview magazines

Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.
Fullscreen