©Chris Morgan

ONLNINE ORDERING, LOCAL FOCUS AND HOLISTIC CONNECTION

  3 min

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

INTERVIEW

Online ordering, local focus and holistic connection

Restaurant Associates Head of Operations Ben Tamlyn about the changing foodservice industry

Ben Tamlyn is the Head of Operations for Compass at Google in the United Kingdom. He originally comes from Wiltshire, a county in the southwest of England, and has been a chef for 22 years at multiple restaurants. In his current position, he oversees the culinary direction for Compass @ Google locations in the United Kingdom. Food Inspiration asked him about the changes in gastronomy caused by COVID-19.

Jaimy van der Linden  Xiao Er Kong

Flavour, texture, sustainability and nutrition will still remain at the core of what we create”

©Tim Blake

©Tim Blake

“Although distancing measures continue to be relaxed in the UK, restaurants and cafes are still unable to return to normal business. What we have seen is many food businesses swiftly adapt to the new situation and pivoting into home-delivery, takeaway and providing support to key workers within healthcare and education. Many of my colleagues and peers within the wider industry have spoken to me about how individuals from older generations have now embraced online ordering and have discovered how easy and simple it is to do so. I believe that this method of engaging and ordering will continue to grow and become more commonplace moving forward.” 

“Another change in behaviour I foresee is an increased consumer demand for transparency in sourcing and procurement. Our guests want to know not just the source of the ingredients we use but also the narrative behind the ingredients and suppliers. Even more focus on local farmers, producers and suppliers will be inevitable as borders remain closed and airfreighting will continue to become more expensive and frowned upon from a sustainability perspective.”


How has the food culture in the United Kingdom changed since the start of the Coronavirus crisis?

I believe that online ordering will continue to grow and become more commonplace moving forward”

©Tim Blake

“Distancing within our operations, both front of house and back of house, will certainly prove challenging, and for the interim, we will need to consolidate and streamline our food offer. This doesn't mean we will reduce the quality, craveability and care we put into all of our meals. Actually, it's a time when ‘hospitality’ will really come to the fore more than ever. We need to help our guests continue to feel comfortable, secure and happy within our restaurants and cafes, especially in this new environment.”


How are the operations at Compass @ Google changing due to COVID-19?

©Chris Morgan

©Chris Morgan

“To me, food is pleasure and time to share with family, friends and colleagues. As an industry, we need to remain nimble and ensure we still offer peaks or special moments, so that we do not lose that holistic connection with food and the pleasure it brings.

Flavour, texture, sustainability and nutrition will still remain at the core of what we create. And working with even more local and small suppliers will positively impact our supply chain.”


Do you think that COVID-19 will change the perception of eating out of home?

Adaptability, support and kindness. It has been inspiring to see how the industry has diversified and adapted so quickly. Different chefs and suppliers, across different businesses, around the globe supporting each other with kindness, solidarity and knowledge. It has really crystalized what an incredible global community we are part of and how camaraderie still runs so deeply within the food industry. This is truly something for us all to be very proud of.”

What have been the most important lessons you have learned from the Coronavirus crisis?

We should not lose that holistic connection with food and the pleasure it brings”

©Tim Blake

©Chris Morgan

©Chris Morgan

Humans have not evolved to isolate in bubbles” 

“It certainly will be different from the past, but it is for us to solve many challenges and weather many storms along the way as we learn and feel our way through this ambiguous new reality. One thing I'm sure of is that humans have not evolved to isolate in bubbles, figuratively or metaphorically and as an industry we need to find a way for our guests to remain connected through food and over the table. We must not lose the magic, enjoyment and sharing of food.”


What do you expect the future of gastronomy to look like?

©Chris Morgan

  3 min

Offline: This content can only be displayed when online.

Online ordering, local focus and holistic connection

Restaurant Associates Head of Operations Ben Tamlyn about the changing foodservice industry

Jaimy van der Linden  Xiao Er Kong

Ben Tamlyn is the Head of Operations for Compass at Google in the United Kingdom. He originally comes from Wiltshire, a county in the southwest of England, and has been a chef for 22 years at multiple restaurants. In his current position, he oversees the culinary direction for Compass @ Google locations in the United Kingdom. Food Inspiration asked him about the changes in gastronomy caused by COVID-19.

Nature moves fast. So I knew I had to move faster.”

©Tim Blake

©Tim Blake

“Although distancing measures continue to be relaxed in the UK, restaurants and cafes are still unable to return to normal business. What we have seen is many food businesses swiftly adapt to the new situation and pivoting into home-delivery, takeaway and providing support to key workers within healthcare and education. Many of my colleagues and peers within the wider industry have spoken to me about how individuals from older generations have now embraced online ordering and have discovered how easy and simple it is to do so. I believe that this method of engaging and ordering will continue to grow and become more commonplace moving forward.” 

“Another change in behaviour I foresee is an increased consumer demand for transparency in sourcing and procurement. Our guests want to know not just the source of the ingredients we use but also the narrative behind the ingredients and suppliers. Even more focus on local farmers, producers and suppliers will be inevitable as borders remain closed and airfreighting will continue to become more expensive and frowned upon from a sustainability perspective.”


How has the food culture in the United Kingdom changed since the start of the Coronavirus crisis?

I believe that online ordering will continue to grow and become more commonplace moving forward” 

©Tim Blake

“Distancing within our operations, both front of house and back of house, will certainly prove challenging, and for the interim, we will need to consolidate and streamline our food offer. This doesn't mean we will reduce the quality, craveability and care we put into all of our meals. Actually, it's a time when ‘hospitality’ will really come to the fore more than ever. We need to help our guests continue to feel comfortable, secure and happy within our restaurants and cafes, especially in this new environment.”


How are the operations at Compass @ Google changing due to COVID-19?

©Chris Morgan

“To me, food is pleasure and time to share with family, friends and colleagues. As an industry, we need to remain nimble and ensure we still offer peaks or special moments, so that we do not lose that holistic connection with food and the pleasure it brings.

Flavour, texture, sustainability and nutrition will still remain at the core of what we create. And working with even more local and small suppliers will positively impact our supply chain.”


Do you think that COVID-19 will change the perception of eating out of home?

Adaptability, support and kindness. It has been inspiring to see how the industry has diversified and adapted so quickly. Different chefs and suppliers, across different businesses, around the globe supporting each other with kindness, solidarity and knowledge. It has really crystalized what an incredible global community we are part of and how camaraderie still runs so deeply within the food industry. This is truly something for us all to be very proud of.”

What have been the most important lessons you have learned from the Coronavirus crisis?

We should not lose that holistic connection with food and the pleasure it brings” 

©Tim Blake

“It certainly will be different from the past, but it is for us to solve many challenges and weather many storms along the way as we learn and feel our way through this ambiguous new reality. One thing I'm sure of is that humans have not evolved to isolate in bubbles, figuratively or metaphorically and as an industry we need to find a way for our guests to remain connected through food and over the table. We must not lose the magic, enjoyment and sharing of food.”


What do you expect the future of gastronomy to look like?

Humans have not evolved to isolate in bubbles” 

©Chris Morgan

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Overview magazines

Food Inspiration Magazine is the online magazine for foodservice professionals in search of inspiration and innovation. With the magazine we collect, enrich and spread inspiration. The free subscription magazine is published eight times per year and is an abundant source of inspiration for food and hospitality professionals. Our readers can be found in the U.S., Northern Europe, Latin America and Asia.
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